top of page

Club History

1931
A London Transport busman's joyride flight over London was organised by driver E. Godwin.  The flight took place on 11th February  in an Armstong Whitworth Argosy II from Imperial Airways.

A London Transport busman's joyride flight over London was organised by driver E. Godwin. The flight took place on 11th February in an Armstong Whitworth Argosy II from Imperial Airways.

Hoping to copy the success of other London Transport Sports Clubs, who took advantage of the scale of its captive audience, an aircraft was loaded onto the back of a lorry and paraded around 48 London Transport garages to drum up interest.

Hoping to copy the success of other London Transport Sports Clubs, who took advantage of the scale of its captive audience, an aircraft was loaded onto the back of a lorry and paraded around 48 London Transport garages to drum up interest.

As a result, 1500 London Transport employees joined, the club paying 6d a week, making it the largest flying club in the world.   The London Transport Sports Association Flying Club officially inaugurated at The Feathers Hotel, Westminster, on the 24th June.

As a result, 1500 London Transport employees joined, the club paying 6d a week, making it the largest flying club in the world. The London Transport Sports Association Flying Club officially inaugurated at The Feathers Hotel, Westminster, on the 24th June.

The Club purchased a Robinson Redwing plus several Moth Majors including G-ADAN and G-ACCX.  Flying cost 8s an hour.  The Club formerly opened on the 17th September 1931 at Broxbourne Aerodrome, Hertfordshire, with a day of flying related fun!

The Club purchased a Robinson Redwing plus several Moth Majors including G-ADAN and G-ACCX. Flying cost 8s an hour. The Club formerly opened on the 17th September 1931 at Broxbourne Aerodrome, Hertfordshire, with a day of flying related fun!

1932
The Club celebrated it's 2000 flight

The Club celebrated it's 2000 flight

1939
With the outbreak of war, civil flying ceased and the club aircraft were reassigned to the RAF.  None of them survived, however, the club itself continued.

With the outbreak of war, civil flying ceased and the club aircraft were reassigned to the RAF. None of them survived, however, the club itself continued.

1946
After the war, Broxbourne was unavailable, so took a lease on an old dispersal hut at Fairoaks.

After the war, Broxbourne was unavailable, so took a lease on an old dispersal hut at Fairoaks.

The Club was one of the first flying clubs to reopen once the ban on civil aviation was lifted.  The club was reopened by Lord Ashfield, the Chairman of London Transport.

The Club was one of the first flying clubs to reopen once the ban on civil aviation was lifted. The club was reopened by Lord Ashfield, the Chairman of London Transport.

Ted Baker became the clubs CFI and remained so for many years.

Ted Baker became the clubs CFI and remained so for many years.

1953
The Club bought 2 Tiger Moths from the Air Ministry (including G-AIIZ).

The Club bought 2 Tiger Moths from the Air Ministry (including G-AIIZ).

1955
Auster Autocrat purchased

Auster Autocrat purchased

1964
One of the two club Tiger Moths was retired from service.

One of the two club Tiger Moths was retired from service.

1965
Piper Colt G-ASSE purchased

Piper Colt G-ASSE purchased

1967
Piper Cherokee G-AVLU purchased

Piper Cherokee G-AVLU purchased

1969
Chief flying instructor Ted Baker retires with 11,000 flying hours with the club.

Chief flying instructor Ted Baker retires with 11,000 flying hours with the club.

1975
BBC Nationwide programme filmed G-AVLU at Fairoaks.   At this time, the club had 2000 members paying a subscription of 3p per week.   Flying rates were £4.20 per hour.

BBC Nationwide programme filmed G-AVLU at Fairoaks. At this time, the club had 2000 members paying a subscription of 3p per week. Flying rates were £4.20 per hour.

The Tiger Moth G-AIIZ was sold and replaced with a Piper Cherokee 140, G-AXTI.

The Tiger Moth G-AIIZ was sold and replaced with a Piper Cherokee 140, G-AXTI.

1985
Privatisation of London Transport begins

Privatisation of London Transport begins

1991
The London Transport Sports Association proposed closing the club, but instead the members took it over and the London Transport Flying Club Limited was formed. The aircraft bought from the Central Sports Association for £1 each.

The London Transport Sports Association proposed closing the club, but instead the members took it over and the London Transport Flying Club Limited was formed. The aircraft bought from the Central Sports Association for £1 each.

1994
Club aircraft are repainted and re-registered as G-LTFB and G-LTFC

Club aircraft are repainted and re-registered as G-LTFB and G-LTFC

2001
Piper Warrior G-BSBA purchased.

Piper Warrior G-BSBA purchased.

2003
G-LTFB is sold and the club is back to 2 aircraft.

G-LTFB is sold and the club is back to 2 aircraft.

2005
To aid cashflow in difficult economic times, G-LTFC was sold to Falcon Flight Services and leased back

To aid cashflow in difficult economic times, G-LTFC was sold to Falcon Flight Services and leased back

2006
G-LTFC leaves the club on 20 July, destined for a new home in Bristol.  

A deposit is placed on a Polish Aero AT3.

G-LTFC leaves the club on 20 July, destined for a new home in Bristol.

A deposit is placed on a Polish Aero AT3.

75th anniversary celebrations took place on 17 September.

75th anniversary celebrations took place on 17 September.

bottom of page